DownBeat Portland Jazz Festival
JANUARY 2013  News  I  Current  I  Archives  I  Reviews  I  Jazz School  I  Subscribe

Top from left: Eric Miller, Dave Robaire, Miro Sprague, Mike Cottone. Bottom from left: Wayne Shorter, Diego Urbano, Josh Johnson, Jonathan Pinson, Herbie Hancock. (Photo: Chip Latshaw)

Monk Institute Increases West Coast Presence
A roving, moveable feast of an operation, the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz has been making waves and introducing new young voices to jazz for a quarter century—more of an institution in motion than a physical locality. As of fall 2012, for instance, it has returned its Jazz Performance program to Los Angeles.
More »

Vandoren

Small hrHEADLINESSmall hr

Traditional Jazz Meets Modern Dance
Louisville’s historic Brown Theatre was the perfect setting for the classic New Orleans jazz of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band (PHJB) …
More »

Corea, Souza and Spalding Among Grammy Nominees
Pianist Chick Corea, bassist/vocalist Esperanza Spalding, vocalist Luciana Souza and saxophonist Kenny Garrett are among the artists …
More »

First China Jazz Festival Features Special Guests, Seminars
The house lights dim, a hush falls over the crowd and a lonely video camera on a 30-foot boom slowly moves toward center stage as Mr. Zhang Xiaolu …
More »

Sitar Virtuoso Ravi Shankar Dies at 92
Sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar died on Dec. 11 at San Diego’s Scripps Hospital. The preceding week, he had undergone heart-valve replacement surgery …
More »

ECM

Small hr
REVIEWS // EDITORS’ PICKS
Small hr

1BY BOBBY REED
Robert Glasper Experiment,
Black Radio Recovered:
The Remix EP
(Blue Note)
Robert Glasper Experiment’s genre-mixing Black Radio was released on Feb. 28, 2012, and it has stayed at the forefront of fans’ minds for 10 …
More »

BY FRANK ALKYER
José James,
No Beginning No End

(Blue Note)
José James says he doesn’t want to be called a jazz singer any longer. Up to this point in his career, the 34-year-old, genre-bending vocalist has felt uncomfortably painted into the jazz corner. …
More »

BY BOBBY REED
Pamela York,
Lay Down This World

(Jazzful Heart Music)
Canadian pianist Pamela York explores sacred music that predates the 20th century on her latest album, the excellent Lay Down This World: Hymns And Spirituals. …
More »

BY FRANK ALKYER
Tyler Mitchell Quintet,
Live At Smalls
(SmallsLIVE)
Every few months, I’ll get a package in the mail that brings a true smile. It’s the latest set of recordings from the SmallsLIVE record label—usually three or four new discs, all recorded live at Smalls Jazz Club in New York. …
More »

BY AARON COHEN
Allison Miller’s Boom Tic Boom, Live At Willisau (Foxhaven)
Right after Allison Miller’s group Boom Tic Boom performed at Switzerland’s Willisau jazz festival in August 2011, the drummer says she couldn’t wait to release the results. …
More »

BY BOBBY REED
Brubeck Brothers Quartet, LifeTimes
(Blue Forest Records)
The news of Dave Brubeck’s death on Dec. 5 sent me on a long sonic journey, back through the titles of his illustrious career, including the massive box set The Columbia Studio Albums Collection 1955–1966
More »

BY FRANK ALKYER
John Zorn,
The Concealed
(Tzadik)
John Zorn is in the midst of an incredible outpouring, with 35 new recordings in the past three years. His album The Concealed is proof that Zorn is the rarest of artists—one who can produce expansive amounts music with vision, detail and quality. …
More »

BY HILARY BROWN
Savion Glover, Fours
(Half Note)
Tap dancer Savion Glover says he thinks in terms of notes and beats, rather than steps and combinations. He recorded Fours—a series of vastly different “jams” with pianists McCoy Tyner and Eddie Palmieri and drummers Roy Haynes and Jack DeJohnette—with that same sensibility. The rhythmic dialogues between Glover …
More »

BY AARON COHEN
Marcos Valle, Previsão Do Tempo (Light In The Attic)
Brazilian singer Marcos Valle made his mark during the early-to-mid-1960s bossa nova wave with such international hits as “Samba De Verão”—a.k.a. “So Nice (Summer Samba).” He could have continued along this lyrical path to guaranteed financial success …
More »

BY AARON COHEN
Tom Piazza, The Southern Journey of Alan Lomax: Words, Photographs, and Music (W. W. Norton & Company)
Very few people have done more to preserve America’s music than folklorist Alan Lomax. Starting in 1933, Lomax (then working with his father) traveled throughout the country and amassed hours …
More »

Small hr
JAZZ SCHOOL // TOOLSHED
Small hr

Anniversary Hand Drums
Toca is marking its 20th anniversary with a collection of special-edition drums, including an 11-inch quinto, an 11.75-inch conga, a 12.5-inch tumbadora, 7-inch and 8.5-inch bongos and a 12-inch rope-tuned Freestyle II djembe with a goatskin head. …
More »

57 Pickup
EMG’s new 57 active humbucker is a bridge pickup suitable for any genre of guitar-playing. The combination of Alnico V magnets with steel pole pieces produces a type of tone that suits …
More »

DAW Upgrade
PreSonus has released Studio One 2.5. Free to Studio One 2 DAW users, this update adds nearly …
More »

Plugged-in Drums
Carlsbro’s new ADD501SL electronic drum kit features 400 percussion voices with 20 preset drum kits and 15 user-defined setups. …
More »

Composition Concepts
Travis Reuter’s new book Compositions (Mel Bay) examines the concepts and frameworks behind nine of the New York-based guitarist’s original compositions. The book focuses on abstract forms, rhythmic counterpoint …
More »

Motema Records

ECM

ECM

ELEW

Theo Wanne

American Jazz Museum

ARC

Small hrCURRENT ISSUESmall hrIssue

Small hrCLASSIC INTERVIEW
Small hr
Classic by Ralph Gleason // August 8, 1957
Dave Brubeck: “They Said I Was Too Far Out”

David Warren Brubeck, at the age of 36, is a successful man in his chosen profession, a man who has designed his life to suit his own taste, and despite the rigors of a high-pressure business, manages to spend more time at home with his wife and five children than can almost anyone in a comparable position.

During the year 1956, Brubeck spent only 180 days on the road. He frequently flew back to Oakland, Calif., for a week with his family. Perhaps it was for only one or two days. And during the time he was off the road, much of it was devoted to digging and raking and shoveling on the mountaintop he owns in the residential district of Oakland.

He was born in 1920 in Concord, Calif., a small town inland about 30 miles from San Francisco. His father was a cattleman, buyer of herd beef and manager of cattle ranches. His mother was the daughter of a stage coach operator who ran a regular passenger and mail coach from Concord over the hills to Oakland.
More »

Footer