Premiere: Hear a Track from new Jim Black, Jonathan Goldberger, JP Schlegelmilch Collab

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JP Schlegelmilch (left), Jonathan Goldberger and Jim Black

(Photo: Reuben Radding/Peter Gannushkin/Emiliano Neri)

For more than two decades, Jim Black’s been the backbeat to some extraordinary collaborations, usually settled somewhere at the fringes of the jazz ecosystem.

In a new trio, the drummer continues working some avant and psychedelic sounds into the genre alongside guitarist Jonathan Goldberger and keyboardist JP Schlegelmilch. The troupe, angling to re-invigorate the organ trio format, is set to issue its debut, Visitors, on Sept. 21.

The effort veers from rock-inflected, grandiose gestures on “Chiseler” to McLaughlin-meets-ambient gambits on “Terminal Waves.” Below is the debut of another track from the album, “Corvus,” a cut spacey enough to generate empathy for long-lost space explorers and robots, despite being named after a bird.

“Corvus refers to crows—it’s the genus of birds they belong to. And some kind of black magic did happen in the studio with this track,” Goldberger said. “It’s written in a meter that’s odd and not so intuitive, and Jim just ate it for breakfast. The intro is interesting in that we pre-recorded JP’s organ into a ’70s Korg tape echo, then had to sync it up with tape playback.”

For additional information about the upcoming disc, visit Skirl Records. DB



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January 2019
Eric Dolphy
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