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Pat Metheny (Photo: Jimmy & Dena Katz)

DownBeat Announces 2013 Readers Poll Results
The results of the 78th Annual DownBeat Readers Poll are in. Guitarist Pat Metheny was named as the readers’ choice for the DownBeat Hall of Fame, and he was voted the Guitarist of the Year. Saxophonist Wayne Shorter topped an unprecedented five categories, winning Jazz Artist of the Year, Jazz Album of the Year (for his quartet’s Blue Note disc Without A Net), Jazz Group of the Year (Wayne Shorter Quartet), Soprano Saxophonist of the Year and Composer of the Year.
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Small hr HEADLINESSmall hr Danilo Pérez & Geri Allen: A Live Blindfold Test from Detroit
Pianists Danilo Pérez and Geri Allen were prominently featured at the 2013 Detroit Jazz Festival. As Artist-in-Residence, Pérez presented two opuses: Panama 500 with a world-class unit and Panama Suite with the Wayne State University Big Band.
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Vijay Iyer To Team With ECM Records
Pianist and composer Vijay Iyer has announced a new collaboration with leading jazz label ECM Records. Iyer, who was awarded a MacArthur fellowship in September, will release Mutations on March 4, 2014.
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New Youth Jazz Festival To Debut in Seattle in 2014
The Seattle Jazz Experience, a new, two-day youth jazz festival, will debut in March 2014 for high school and college jazz students throughout the Pacific Northwest.
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Versatile Flutist, Saxophonist Frank Wess Dies at 91
Flutist and saxophonist Frank Wess, whose long career included a stint in Count Basie’s band in the ’50s and ’60s, passed away from kidney failure on Oct. 30. He was 91.
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REVIEWS // EDITORS’ PICKS
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1 BY FRANK ALKYER
3 Cohens, Tightrope (Anzic)
On Tightrope, Anat, Avishai and Yuval Cohen liken themselves to a musical version of trapeze artists The Flying Wallendas, improvising in, around and through each other without a net. But the music on this album sounds more like a wonderfully boisterous family dinner, where the two brothers and their sister chat—in, around and through each other. ...
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1 BY FRANK ALKYER
Marc Cary Focus Trio, Four Directions (Motéma)
This is the first studio album in seven years from pianist Marc Cary’s Focus Trio, and it was well worth the wait. For fans of the group, there have been two live recordings in between, both giving a strong sense of one of the most fascinating bands on the scene. But the studio offers sonic opportunities you don’t get when dealing with the constraints of a live setting. ...
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1 BY DAVIS INMAN
Ghost Train Orchestra, Book Of Rhapsodies (Accurate)
Trumpeter and arranger Brian Carpenter has followed a footnote from Gunther Schuller’s book The Swing Era down a rabbit hole to a bizarre, charming world of nearly forgotten music from the 1930s. While the Ghost Train Orchestra’s 2011 album, Hothouse Stomp, delved into the music of the ’20s, Book Of Rhapsodies moves forward—though just slightly—to showcase new arrangements of music written between 1935 and 1942. Four composers and bandleaders of the era—Alec Wilder, Raymond Scott, John Kirby and Reginald Foresythe—are represented here. ...
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1 BY BOBBY REED
Gretchen Parlato, Live In NYC (ObliqSound)
It’s common for singers to talk about their voice being one of the instruments on the bandstand, but in recent years, rarely has this concept been illustrated as well as it is on Gretchen Parlato’s CD/DVD release Live In NYC. Rather than floating atop the instrumentation of her collaborators, Parlato operates from inside the arrangement, employing her light, occasionally breathy voice in the same type of improvisatory, push-and-pull dynamic that characterizes any great rhythm section. ...
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1 BY BOBBY REED
Harold López-Nussa, New Day (Jazz Village)
The title of Cuban pianist Harold López-Nussa’s latest album, New Day, connotes optimism, and the music contained in this original program radiates joy. “Every day we face obstacles but also the chance to learn from them and make everything better,” the pianist has said. “It’s our responsibility to find and build happiness for ourselves and the people around us. ...
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1 BY FRANK ALKYER
Robert Glasper Experiment, Black Radio 2 (Blue Note)
The Robert Glasper Experiment’s 2012 album Black Radio was a huge hit, debuting at No. 15 on the Billboard Top 200. The sequel is even better. In the first installment, there was a looseness, flow and free spirit that was infectious, but Black Radio 2 tightens things up in just the right places. The pacing of this album is impeccable, the songwriting and arranging, excellent. The guest cast of rappers and soul singers is a dream team, and they bring it. Bottom line: This is one of those rare, perfect records. ...
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1 BY FRANK ALKYER
Marquis Hill, The Poet (Skiptone Music)
The broad-shouldered city of Chicago is where trumpeter Marquis Hill plies his trade—in bands like his own Blacktet and Matt Ulery’s Loom, and in clubs like Andy’s, the Green Mill, Constellation and the Jazz Showcase. Hill represents the next generation of the Chicago Sound. In his conception, that sound has the drive of hard-bop and the flow of hip-hop. If you’re not lucky enough to catch this 26-year-old’s full, round trumpet tone in concert, his new album, The Poet, is the next best thing. ...
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1 BY DAVIS INMAN
Wynton Marsalis, The Spiritual Side Of Wynton Marsalis (Columbia/Sony Classical/Legacy)
Wynton Marsalis curated this compilation of 15 spirituals, originally recorded from 1991–2002, and only one track is previously unreleased: a moving duo version of the gospel standard “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” by vocalist Marion Williams and pianist Eric Reed. It’s an outtake from 1994’s In This House, On This Morning, the Marsalis Septet’s two-disc recreation of a full church service. ...
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1 BY BOBBY REED
Eric Bibb, Jericho Road (Stony Plain)
If people want to know who blues singer-songwriter Eric Bibb’s influences are, all they have to do is listen to his song “Good Like You” from his new disc, Jericho Road. Bibb name-checks a dozen artists in this original tune, including Mavis Staples, Bonnie Raitt, Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder. Fans of those artists (as well as followers of socially conscious bluesman Otis Taylor) are likely to enjoy Jericho Road, which is a blues-oriented Beyond album that gracefully incorporates folk and world-music elements. ...
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JAZZ SCHOOL // TOOLSHED
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Rotary Experience
Hammond’s Leslie Pedal encompasses profiles of the three most popular Leslie cabinets …
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Rainbow Keys
Korg is offering a run of keyboards in limited-edition colors. The MicroKorg synth-vocoder is available …
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Now Ear This
Westone has debuted the UM Pro series of in-ear monitors for professional musicians. …
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Jamjuree Aspirations
Latin Percussion has added a 12.5-inch diameter djembe to its Aspire series. …
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Humidity Control
MusicNomad has introduced The Humitar, an acoustic guitar humidifier. …
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Motema

ECM

Telluride

Cannonball

JodyJazz


Seattle Jazz Experience

University of Chicago Press

American Jazz Museum

ARC

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Small hrCLASSIC INTERVIEW
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Classic Josef Woodard // 8/1/1992
A Healthy Dose of Disrespect: Pat Metheny & Charlie Haden
From outward appearances, Pat Metheny and Charlie Haden might not seem to have a lot in common. Guitarist Pat (b. 1954) has a bushel of hair and a tan that won’t quit. Bassist Charlie (b. 1937) is pale, with closely cropped hair. But closer examination of their ongoing friendship and musical collaborations reveals the folly of banking on outward appearances.
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